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Each member of your field service team has a personal combination of skills, abilities, and natural talents. Your customers get to know them personally and they build a rapport as well as familiarity with each location they work in. You rely on them to use their own judgment and solve problems in the moment, but also to know when it's time to consult with headquarters. Maintaining this unique balance of independence and support is what makes a field service team strong. Your technicians will back each other up, make helpful suggestions, and work together to provide the level of service your clients require. Naturally, you want to optimize the results of their successes, and here are a few ways to get started:

1.  Always Be Improving

When it comes to high-quality work and customer service, there is always room for improvement. Especially in cases where you enter people's homes and businesses, you should always be seeking ways to provide more for your customers and make the work easier for your workers. This means taking on tactics like thoughtfully matching your technician's talents to the needs of a job. While all your team members may be able to handle a particular task, often their individual preferences and proficiencies will vary.

2.  Be Ready to Send Backup

In most cases, your standard service unit (from one technician to a team of specialists) will be enough to handle on-site jobs, but every now and then more extreme or unusual circumstances arise. In these cases, you trust your team to call in for consultation and you should reward them by providing fast, helpful backup. When things really go off the wall, it's heartening to know that a backup team will soon be riding in with the extra needed people and equipment. This will not only raise the morale and effectiveness of your team, it will also impress your customers with your dedication to handling absolutely any job.

3.  Regularly Collect Feedback

The best way to improve on your process is to know how well each technique is doing. You can do this by collecting a steady stream of feedback for each work order completed. Customers are often happiest when feedback is requested by email with the ability to provide a quick star rating, though your favorites will probably be those compelled to write glowing descriptions of their service. You also want to get feedback from your team and it may be more constructive to do this in a weekly meeting or welcomed in their closing reports for each job.

4.  Customer Loyalty

When you have regular customers, as many field service businesses do, you can make sure to provide a personal touch by sending the same technician to customers they introduced to your service. This not only gives your customers a chance to form a personal relationship with their service provider, it also reduces the amount of time your technicians spend learning a new home or setup. By having one team member assigned to each location, they can return to a familiar situation and end up working with their own previous procedures.

When managing a field service team, naturally you want the best possible experience for both your customers and team members. When your technicians are out there building relationships with clients and working within their specialties, everybody wins. Constantly taking in feedback and adapting your management strategies will keep your teams working at their peak and your customers delighted by how much you care about their individual experiences. Getting the best results from your field service team is a simple matter of thoughtfulness, preparation, and never forgetting the personal touch
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Kimberly Heuser | Service Power
Kimberly is a ServicePower's Marketing Program Manager. She is strong in marketing strategy, marketing campaign creation and management. Previously, Kimberly served as a Digital Project Manger at HSP Direct, a political fundraising company in which she created, implemented and managed digital marketing campaigns for politicians seeking office, large Political Action Committees and non-profit organizations. Prior to that, she owned a marketing and web design company where she developed and implemented marketing campaigns for radio networks, secondary education institutions, manufacturers, small businesses, online magazines and assisted local/international ministries with the development of their brand, web presence and marketing before moving to the Northern Virginia area. She also served as a Marketing Manager for several multi-million dollar distribution companies, where she worked with some of the largest household brands across the U.S. to create and launch marketing campaigns.
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